Tantramar Tantramar Acadian


Convocation

Marjorie Young Bell Convocation Hall
37 York Steet, Sackville, N.B.

MARJORIE YOUNG BELL CONVOCATION HALL
1966

Opened in October 1966 the monumental Convocation Hall building contains a 1500 seat auditorium, a spacious foyer, dressing rooms, rehearsal space, offices and a workshop. It serves as the venue for major events such as convocations, concerts, and guest speakers. While the building is largely brick, the impressive Classical facade is of stone with six large round columns with an entablature above, and steps leading up to the entrance doors. The building was designed by the Foundation of Canada Engineering Corporation Ltd.

The building is named for Marjorie Young Bell, wife of Mount Allison's first Chancellor Ralph Pickard Bell , and like him a very generous benefactor of the University.

Convocation Hall stands on the site previously occupied by Fawcett Hall which was demolished to make way for the new facility. Fawcett Hall was built in 1910 and had a classical facade with Ionic columns and a pediment with sculptured figures. Whereas Fawcett Hall faced on to York Street Convocation Hall faces west towards the rest of the campus.

Fawcett Hall is commemorated by a plaque on the facade of Convocation Hall (see below).

[Picture of Fawcett Hall]

THE CHARLES FAWCETT MEMORIAL HALL

OCCUPIED THIS SITE FROM 1910 TO 1965

IT WILL BE WARMLY REMEMBERED AND MISSED
BY ALL ALLISONIANS OF THAT ERA
Fawcett

Another plaque on the facade of Convocation Hall is a reminder that this site was originally part of the property of Charles Frederick Allison, founder of the university.

Leroux, John and Thaddeus Holownia, A Vision in Wood & Stone: The Architecture of Mount Allison University , (Kentville, N.S.: Gaspereau Press, 2016), pp.69-73 (Fawcett Hall), 171-176 (Convocation Hall).

Jackson, Kip and Charlie Scobie, Sackville Then and Now: New Brunswick's Oldest Town in Photographs (Sackville, N.B.: Tantramar Heritage Trust, 2013), p.86-87.


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